Seaka's Voyage to Queensland.

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This forum is for members to share their top hat sailing experiences, whether it be an interesting day sail, a coastal passage, or a journey across the oceans.
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Re: Seaka's Voyage to Queensland.

Postby Phillip » Tue Jun 14, 2011 2:41 pm

Greg,

I know, your just jealous! :P

Phillip.
Phillip.
SEAKA
A 1969 Mark 1
http://www.sailblogs.com/member/seaka
http://skipr.net

Home port is at Dunbogan on the Camden Haven Inlet, Laurieton NSW
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Re: Seaka's Voyage to Queensland.

Postby Dolphin » Tue Jun 14, 2011 7:17 pm

Phillip,
BLOODY OATH! :mrgreen:
Greg
Felicite Mk III
Lake Macquarie
"After it's all said and done, there is a lot more said than done!" Aesop 620 BC
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Re: Seaka's Voyage to Queensland.

Postby Miker » Wed Jun 15, 2011 10:08 am

Hey Phillip,

Your blog says "will update blog on Sunday", well Sunday's been and gone and here we all are waiting with baited breath to hear what's happened between Bundaberg and Mackay.....

Talk about keeping us in suspenders! :mrgreen:
Michael
"Dulcamara" - MKIII
Careel Bay, Pittwater
"Order of the Tipping Dinghy" 2017
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Re: Seaka's Voyage to Queensland.

Postby Phillip » Wed Jun 15, 2011 3:13 pm

Come on guys I'm in cruising mode :D

It will happen today, 4000 + words and Photos.

At this time just have to reduce the Photos and then post.

Phillip.

Being hasselled at MacKay Marina.
Phillip.
SEAKA
A 1969 Mark 1
http://www.sailblogs.com/member/seaka
http://skipr.net

Home port is at Dunbogan on the Camden Haven Inlet, Laurieton NSW
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Re: Seaka's Voyage to Queensland.

Postby Phillip » Wed Jun 15, 2011 9:11 pm

Hi all,

Blog is up [2100hours], photo gallery will follow tomorrw afternoon.

I am going to crash now!

Phillip.
MacKay Marina.
Phillip.
SEAKA
A 1969 Mark 1
http://www.sailblogs.com/member/seaka
http://skipr.net

Home port is at Dunbogan on the Camden Haven Inlet, Laurieton NSW
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Phillip
 
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Re: Seaka's Voyage to Queensland.

Postby Phillip » Thu Jun 16, 2011 6:37 pm

To Dolphin and All,

The Sailblog site seems to be down as at 1833 today Thursday 16th June 2011.

I have yet to load the photo gallery, but will do so as soon as possible.

Phillip
MacKay Marina.

Sailing to St Bees Island midday Friday. :D
Phillip.
SEAKA
A 1969 Mark 1
http://www.sailblogs.com/member/seaka
http://skipr.net

Home port is at Dunbogan on the Camden Haven Inlet, Laurieton NSW
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Re: Seaka's Voyage to Queensland.

Postby Miker » Fri Jun 17, 2011 9:35 am

Phillip, it's still down today at 0935.

Here's hoping they'll pay their bill soon and get the server back up. :cry:

Michael
Michael
"Dulcamara" - MKIII
Careel Bay, Pittwater
"Order of the Tipping Dinghy" 2017
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Re: Seaka's Voyage to Queensland.

Postby Dolphin » Fri Jun 17, 2011 1:01 pm

G'Day Mike,
I tried to view the site late on Wed night and my antivirus (Kaspersky) detected a Trojan on the site. Shortly after I couldn't access the site either.
Be patient.
Greg.
Greg
Felicite Mk III
Lake Macquarie
"After it's all said and done, there is a lot more said than done!" Aesop 620 BC
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Re: Seaka's Voyage to Queensland.

Postby Phillip » Sun Jun 19, 2011 8:34 pm

Oh Dear,
Yes the blog site is down, I had noticed when I posted the last lot of info that the lat/long positions were being shown as if I was in the western atlantic! :shock:

This therefore is going to be the LARGEST ever post on our Top Hat site with 5000 plus words. So here goes as it brings up to today, but there are no photos, you will have to wait until the blog site is up for them.

31st May Tuesday. Keppel Bay Marina to North Keppel Island.
The day started at 0530 with adjacent boats gathering crew to leave at 0600. I was not impressed! Derek, from Silver Lady came along later with a bag of solid ice cubes - not like the party ice which is hollow and only lasts 1 or 2 days.
I then went and had a look at the 27 foot Top Hat “Cool Change”. You can see the differences between this factory finish and the usual ones we see in Top Hats. I will put a review up on the Top Hat site [http://www.tophat.org.com.au] at a later date.
At 1100 I was heading out to North Keppel Island to overnight before moving on to Port Clinton. As we sailed out the 10nm at 3 knots the wind increased and all of a sudden Five Rocks, up the coast, became possible. Well the best of plans collapse as did this one with the wind dying completely, so under motor back towards North Keppel Island we went. As I approached North Keppel Island, such was the sunlight that I could not see any indents in the coast that were suitable for anchoring. So I turned away with the intention of going back to Great Keppel Island. Then I spied a mast, so retracing our passage we pulled into Considine Bay behind a Ferro yacht in warm crystal clear water. Did a bit of fishing after seeing some big fish swim past, nothing again! I then went in for a swim and cleaned some of the rubbish off around the water line, beautiful! Later I spoke to Mitch and Meg off the Ferro yacht. We were then invaded by a small flock swallows that perch all over the bow of Seaka for a while.
Then, just on 1700 as I was starting to prepare tea, a SW swell invaded the anchorage, there was no wind. Considering the depth I had anchored in, I was forced to up-anchor and move into deeper water. Black clouds now began appearing in the south and the idyllic anchorage was looking to be a rough and exposed experience. I prepared an escape route to the north and plotted the waypoints into the hand held GPS. Thankfully I did not have to use this plan but wished we had as that night rates as the worst yet for bouncing and rolling. I was awake for most of the night, especially towards the 0230 low tide to ensure we had enough water under us considering the size of the swell.
Phillip.
23 03.95’S: 150 53.12’E

1st June Wednesday. En-route to Port Clinton.
Considering the conditions last night it was early this morning that we took off for Port Clinton. We are starting to see other yachts now with four heading our way and one south. In these shallow Queensland waters [anywhere between 6 and 18m deep] the wind soon produces a 1m chop which is always about 8- 10m apart which means we have to bash our way through every second or third wave. This means a bouncy ride at times.
I mentioned the above because today we nearly had a disaster – I dropped my camera! …. The resulting look of the lenses did not auger well for the future of the camera. So in desperation I forced, yes forced, the lenses back into place. The result was that the camera worked but with no screen to preview the photographs. Later tonight I have changed the batteries and it now works as before. Yippeeee!
At about 1400 we entered Port Clinton and rounded Round Island to anchor south of mount Flinders in 7m at low tide. Two other yachts have anchored up as well. This was an 8.5 hour day.
Phillip.
22 33.18’S: 150 45.48’E

2nd June Thursday, Port Clinton.
Today I inflated the dinghy and went fishing. I had two strikes, one of which was a small Trevalley that was consumed for tea. I used the fish head to bait the Mud Crab pot which I set on the edge of the mangroves. Two large fishing boats anchored stern to stern nearby and the crew set out with a tinnie load of pots, it’s no wonder there are no Mud Crabs in the lower reaches of any of these ports or anchorages. Needless to say I didn’t get any crabs. The water in here is flat and calm which is change to the open anchorages of late.
Phillip.

3rd June Friday, Port Clinton to Pearl Bay.
There was smoke haze this morning from fires on the Shoalwater Military firing range. I checked the Mud Crab pots again – nothing – don’t know really what I’ll do when I get one. Anyway at about 1000 we proceeded out of Port Clinton with the ebbing tide along a beautiful coastline for Pearl Bay where we anchored at 1200.
I inflated the dinghy and went ashore to see if there were any fish around. Eventually another yachty who was fishing on the point gave me the info that produced two fish for tea.
The sky here is brilliant blue today and I am amazed at all the birds you can hear consistently singing in the hills around this bay. No foxes, cats and people I suppose.
There are no phone or internet connections here; I wonder when I will get them back.
Phillip.
22 26.64’S: 150 44.10”E

4th June Saturday. Pearl Bay to Island Head Creek.
Pearl Bay can be infected by the SE swell and last night was one of those periods, so at 0900 I up anchor and motored to island Head Creek. There is no wind at all today. By 1130 we had anchored just inside Island Head Creek, on the south side.

I was back into fishing mode after inflating the dinghy. For those who are interested it only takes about 20 minutes to inflate and get in the water and only 15 minutes to deflate and tie down on the cabin roof. I cannot leave the dinghy inflated on the foredeck for long sails as it gets in the way. This will change with the shorter sails required in the Whitsundays. Anyway set the Mud Crab pot and went fishing in a similar place as last night in Pearl Bat and caught 3 fish for tea. [Too much really!]

I noticed while cleaning the fish that the other four yachts were doing the rounds visiting each other. I disappeared below as I really needed a shower and a shave, plus I stunk of fish.
Phillip.
22 21.15’S: 150 39.50’E

5th June Sunday. Island Head Creek.
Last night was another rolly one, I will have to learn soon, so after picking up the Mud Crab pot we moved over to the first bay inside on the north shore where Island head Creek was mirror smooth. I went fishing for tea and got a Trevalley, but nothing else. Some of the other yacht’s were trying to get a Mackerel but had no success before I moved on.
Had a clean up today with all the read books moved into the forward lockers. Seaka still has a distinct lean of 2° to port, caused no doubt by all the extra fuel onboard of which we have used only 8 litres so far. So have deflated the dinghy and readied Seaka for the run to Hexham Island tomorrow.
Phillip.
22 22.02’S: 150 38.41’E

6th June Monday. Island Head Creek to Hexham Island.
We rose today at 0600 and moved off 50 minutes later. By 0730 we were outside of the creek and had picked up 1.5 knots from the north moving ebb tide. [Flood tides generally move southward.]
Then at 0830 we had our first major breakdown.
Luckily I was down below at the time and when the clattering came from the Nanni Diesel engine I was able to shut it down immediately. A quick look showed that the alternator was lying loose. Before I attempted to analyze the problem I leaped up into the cockpit and put Seaka over onto a tack towards the coast to steady her. We had been running down wind.
Back down below I found that the main fixing bolt for the alternator had snapped in half. In fact the bolt had snapped inside the mount at the start of the threads. This was not looking good – we were in trouble - as there are no electric drills or easy-outs on Seaka! Looking further I discovered a locking nut that was holding the bracket for the regulator, there may be hope yet. I removed the nut and bracket and attempted to move the bolt, no go. So out with the multi-grips and with a little prayer to Poseidon the bolt moved – yes, I could and did get it out!
Now do we have a replacement?
Out came the stainless steel bolt container to search and in fact the first bolt I picked up was the one I wanted, but it needed to be 5mm longer. But that was it. Oh, and a quick visit to the cockpit to put Seaka on the other tack out to sea! There was no way the alternator was going back as before with that short bolt. So I started playing around with alternatives until I decided that the regulator could just hang loose, hoping that it did not require and earth through its connection to the engine. Seem to work fine.
So one hour after that horrible clutter we had it all back together and running with Seaka on course for Hexham Island. I then finished cleaning the stove which was why I was down below in the first place.
As we moved off-shore the water started to turn blue and clear for the first time on this voyage. Eventually at 1340 we rounded the north western corner of Hexham Island to anchor in the small bay next to the Cathedral Rocks in 6m of water. Applied some lard to the mast base in an attempt to stop it clicking during rolling. Then at 1730 we had to re-anchor a bit further out as a NE breeze, which blew gently all night, came into the bay. The birds are singing here too.
We have now been voyaging for two months and today we passed our 800th nautical mile [about 1500km].
Phillip.
22 00.80’S: 150 21.84’E



7th June Tuesday. Hexham Island to Hunter Island in the Duke Islands.
We rose to the dawn bird call, just an amazing sound and one not heard on the mainland, even at home. The crossing to the Duke Islands was only 3 hours and 20 minutes. The ride up to the anchorage with the tide was done at 7.3 knots and I reckon 4 or 5 of that was the tide. We anchored on the west side of Hunter Island at 1120. Fish wise today we saw plenty of tuna but no takers for my lures.
I had a cleanup of the deck after lunch as it was accumulating a bit of dirt. Next on the list was the dreaded ’black mould’ inside the cabins. After that I relaxed in the sun on the foredeck of Seaka. There is a bit of a current running past Seaka so ran a lure back in the current, no fish. A beautiful 50’ ketch came in called ‘Ati Antta’.
Made up a Burgee with Seaka’s name on etc for the ‘A’ frame at West Bay on Middle Island [Percy Islands].
Phillip.
21 58.62’S: 150 08.34’E

8th June Wednesday. Hunter Island to West Bay, Percy Islands.
Today started with a school of tuna chasing bait fish around Seaka. By the time I had got organized most of the action was over but not before I had had two strikes right at the back of Seaka. While I did not get a hook up, moments later I got a Ribbon fish, so tea is sorted.
At 0800 we were underway for the Lola-Mantes Passage through the Duke Islands to the east, bound for West Bay in the Percy Islands. As we motored out, I noticed this cabin cruiser rushing all over the sound and eventually they caught up with me in the Passage. No surprise for who it was, but my official mates [Police, Custom and Fisheries] from Pancake creek! They were a lot more friendly this time [?], but our home port had them stumped and their questions were detailed as to where the Camden Haven is. No photograph taken this time, but said they would see me off MacKay!
As we left the duke Islands we picked up the ebb tide for a quicker voyage. We would lose this advantage close to the Percy Islands the flood setting 1.5 knots against us. With the perfect weather the seas got flatter and flatter until almost mirror flat as we tried to sail towards Middle Island. Eventually, under motor, at 1300 we arrived in West Bay.
I inflated the dinghy and set a stern anchor for the swell, but could not get Seaka to sit with her bow to the waves [now realize that there was probably a tidal current as well which was the reason I could not get Seaka to sit just so] so retrieved the anchor. I then went ashore to see the ‘A’ frame and found a beaut' place for Seaka’s Burgee beside the ladder to the upper floor. I started to photograph the interior when the camera batteries died, so I went back to Seaka.
Of course as soon as I got to Seaka people from the Homestead arrived at the ‘A’ frame. I rowed ashore again [I didn’t mention that I had not fitted the outboard, had I?] and meet Steve and a visitor to the Homestead. Top of their priority was, “did I have any wine they could purchase?” Well I did have a clean skin of white they could have and they paid me with 2 litres of Island honey. [More about that tomorrow]. In line with this battering I ask Steve to send Nancy a text that I was OK as I had had on phone connection for some days. Back at Seaka again I gave the rest of the Ribbon fish to Rick on “NenKi” a large Cat. The fish was beautiful.
Phillip.
21 39.10’S: 150 14.68’E

9th of June Thursday. West Bay, Middle Island in the Percy Islands.
By 0830 I had rowed ashore to the ‘A’ frame and was starting the trek up to the Homestead. Now remember, I haven’t been doing much walking lately so this 3 mile walk took me about an hour. I saw plenty of signs of native wildlife on the sand track. There were also several flocks of goats, which apparently are part of the rural activities of the Homestead. Halfway along the track at a lookout I received several text messages and I sent one to Nancy.
When I arrived at the Homestead Cate invited me in and introduced me to John [they have the lease for part of the Island] who happened to be online so I was able to see the weather forecast which looked OK, but could turn nasty in the next few days [A lot more about that later!]. My phone now had a signal so put a call through to Nancy and then went online to clear my emails and get a copy of the weather forecasts.
The activity being undertaken at the Homestead today was the robbing of the bee hives for honey which is only sold or bartered on the Island, usually at the ‘A’ frame down in West Bay. With Steve and Stan robbing the hives, Cate and Nina were doing the extraction of the honey on a rather large honey extractor. John was about to start making some new hive boxes for some that had pasted their use-by date. As I had made bee boxes before I volunteer to help John out. We set up a bit of a production line with me making the boxes and John getting the messy job of painting them I eventually got roped into the painting as well. By 1300 we had produced 15 boxes, sufficient for what they needed, and their thoughts were going towards the making of foundation frames after lunch.
After a lunch of venison, goat and homemade bread I started my return to West Bay via the steep track or the so called direct route which I took an hour to complete. I was glad I did not use that track to go up to the Homestead. I was saddened to see that there is lantana on the Island and from what I saw it’s at that stage where it could be eradicated or the Island taken over. I also visited the lagoon and the wharf complex [it isn’t much] on the way back to West Bay.
On return to Seaka I found that a short 1m SE swell had entered West Bay. This was making Seaka roll 30 degrees each way every 5 seconds or so. I was now glad I had put that lanolin on the mast base to stop it clicking during rolling. I think the proposed party ashore at the ‘A’ frame tonight will not happen; I won’t be going as it’s just too rolly. So I packed up the dinghy and prepared Seaka for sea. Only beans and eggs for tea tonight.
Phillip.
21 39.10’S: 150 14.68’E

10th June Friday. West Bay to Curlew Island.
That was definitely the worst night for rolling!
I was forced to sleep across the bed with my feet on the down swell side as at times I was almost standing on the sides of the cabin. I could not sleep fore and aft as I was just rolled all over the place. With all that it seems I did get some sleep, but at first light all three of us in West Bay up-anchor and got out. The other two larger vessels opting for Mackay and Seaka for nearby Curlew Island. In fact it’s almost 70nm to MacKay, too far for us if this weather blows up.
So we sailed for Curlew Island, with mainsail only, some 26 nm away and just over six hours sailing. On arrival we had trouble getting the anchor to set, I think I’m a little bit to the east of the recommended line, but the anchor has set in 5m at low tide and we have 25m of chain out.
The weather tomorrow looks as though it will be 20/25 knots [which is OK], so after a bite to eat I changed the Genoa for the Yankee and put 2 reefs in the main sail, working on the plan that it’s easier to take a reef out than put one in. Once again Seaka is wondering all over the place with tidal currents and apposed winds. I could figure out no solution as the dynamics kept changing all the time so will just have to put up with it. To cats have arrived and are anchored ahead of me in very shallow water.
Phillip.
21 35.58’S: 149 47.99’E

11th June Saturday. Curlew Island.
Well I must have offended the Gods!
At around mid-night the winds got up to 25 knots plus! The early morning weather report from Thirsty Sound VMR made it quite clear that we are here until Monday morning at the earliest. As a precaution I also logged in with Thirsty Sound VMR.
[Just a note for my fellow New South Welshmen, the VMR groups in Queensland do not use tracking sheets up and down the coast so there is no connection between each group and you have to go through the complete log on progress each time you move into a new group’s area. Most yachties tend to ignore the VMR on the basis that if they need them they will be there. The VMR will bill you for any real assistance if you are not a member of their group.]
I have rigged up the second anchor for immediate deployment if necessary as the winds will be 25/30 knots until late Sunday. The temperature is around 16 degrees and the wind chill is pulling that down to around 5 degrees. It’s not supposed to be this cold and wet, I forgot to mention all the rain we have had! It has been very rolly all day.
Phillip.


12th June Sunday. Curlew Island.
The lack of sleep has finally caught up with me and I slept in till 0800.
On rising I found that the two Cats had moved off for Mackay. [I spoke to one of them in MacKay the next week and he said that they had recorded gust up to 40 knots at Curlew Island.] I got the weather from Thirsty sound VMR and it will still be 25/30 knots until late this afternoon before abating. In fact late this afternoon the seas have flattened out and the wind has dropped so we will be leaving in the morning.
I spent the day reading and writing these blogs [some 4,000 words]. I had a general clean up and prepared Seaka for sea. Late this afternoon a swell moved into the bay from the NW. A yacht also came in at about 1500 and anchored to the west of me.
Phillip.



13th June Monday. Curlew Island to MacKay.
Alarm went off at 0530 and at 0620 we were under way. Motored out from behind the large sand bar that protects this bay until we were a bit protected behind a small Island to raise the sails. Took all the reefs out of the mainsail and we were soon clipping along at 6 knots and up to 7 knots, beautiful! We were moving with an ebbing tide [which goes north] which also helped but latter we had to compensate for an easterly drift caused by the same tide as we moved north and west towards MacKay.
At 0800 I signed onto MacKay VMR and asked them to sign me off from Thirsty Sound as I could not read them [on arrival at Mackay I forgot to sign off and had to ring them the next morning and apologize]. En-route we crossed the shipping lane into Hay Point, Australia’s largest coal port, as a loaded ship was coming out. Latter we had to change course to avoid a tug towing a barge with a crane on it. At around 1000 as I was speaking to Nancy we passed our 900th nautical mile [1700km]. By now we had virtually no wind so decided to drop all sails and store them for 3 days in harbour. I took the Yankee off as I reckon we will need the Genoa out from MacKay. I followed a large ship into MacKay, it was about 2nm ahead, and it was already docked by the time I came in. The 46nm took 8 hours 45 minutes today at an average 5.3 knots. There are no more big runs until we start the return voyage.
Once docked I paid for 3 nights then had a shower and did the washing.
Phillip.
21 06.79’S: 149 13.62’E

14th June Tuesday. Mackay Marina.
Went to the bus stop and was picked up by a local going into town. Walked around the CBD before making my way out to the Canelands shopping complex. Picked up most of what I wanted but will have to go back briefly tomorrow to get some items.
Have got Skype going now. You will find me at Lorne. Went to the chandler here at the Marina to get some new rope for my anchor snubber and they had nothing in stock! After Curlew Island the 12mm snubber rope was stiff and reduced in diameter, so I reckoned it was past its use-by date. Eventually found a small marine detail firm that had what I wanted and he will also get a replacement bolt for the alternator tomorrow.
After the shopping settled down to type up these blogs. Warm day here but the nights are still cold.
Phillip.

15th June Wednesday. MacKay Marina.
Completed the written part of the blogs this morning and am now off to town. Will do the photographs this afternoon and then post this lot. A cold wind is blowing but quite warm out of it.
Back from town and began sorting photographs. I started uploading the blog around 1600, it’s now 2100 and I am just finishing.
We will be here another day because I found when editing the photographs that my camera is damaged and so it will just as easy to get a new one here. That camera was part of a Cruising Helmsman Magazine promotion that I won some years ago and I have taken thousands of photos with it.
Phillip.


16th June Thursday. MacKay Marina.
Well I purchased a camera by Fujifilm and it’s a wee ripper. The photos are of a better quality being as it is a 14 Mega pixel camera.
Tried to complete the photo galleries for the blog site, but it was down all day. Put the Genoa on and re-watered. We took 75 litres, so that’s 4.5 litres a day since I last filled the tank 17 days ago. So I cleaned up Seaka and prepared her for sea. As a treat I had fish and chips for tea [cooked by somebody else!].
Phillip.

17th June Friday. MacKay Marina to Keswick Island.
Up early and did a small amount of washing before marina office opened. When ready to go we went around to the fuel dock and took on 30 litres of diesel. We had 20 litres left. Today having a short run of only 20nm most of it was done under sail with only that through the Egremont Passage being a motor sail to boost the batteries. We anchored in a small northern bay just outside of the passage with six other vessels. There was a lot of schooling fish around after dark, I couldn’t see what the fish were. Thought I’d throw a line out but failed as I found the reel on my small rod had seized. Will have to look at it tomorrow.
Phillip.
20 53.89’S: 149 24.60’E

18th June Saturday. Keswick Island to Scawfell Island.
Once again just after first light we all started to scatter after a wee bit of a roll overnight. I only put the Genoa up as we only have to go 10nm. As we came out from behind [there is a SE wind] St Bees Island the sea started to get awful, what’s going on here I said to myself [do a lot of that lately], and it appears that the SE’er had been blowing all night. With the wind now at 25 knots we started to run at around 6 knots for a fast trip. For the first time I took a sea in the cockpit, got me too. During the voyage I checked my phone and found that the battery was dead. I had meant to replace it in MacKay but it seemed to come good so I had put the replacement off. Decided we will return to Mackay tomorrow to replace the battery as I may not get another chance further north.
Arrive at Refuge Bay, Scawfell Island and it certainly meet all the praise that others have heaped on it. Anchored in the western bay against the east side out of the SE bullets coming off the hill. So after anchoring I fixed the fishing reel, dried out the anchor well, closed up the Bimini because of the wind and plotted our route north to Lindeman Island.
Phillip.
20 51.87’S: 149 35.55’E

19th June Sunday. Scawfell Island to MacKay Marina via St Bees Island.
Well it was dammed if you do or dammed if you don’t. The weather forecast from VMR Mackay was OK, but, knowing what yesterday was like I suspected that the forecast may be an understatement with winds in Refuge Bay up to 20 knots, and so it was. The seas were OK until we cleared Scawfell Island and then it started. Mind you, we only have the Yankee on, getting a bit more cunning about this in my ‘old’ age. Our speed at the start was OK, around 6 knots plus but as the seas climbed that fell away. These seas are nothing like what we get on the NSW coast, with depths of only 30m or less the seas tend to be about 2m high and about 3m apart when there is a breaking wave. It’s not the breaking wave that’s dangerous but the wave 3m behind as its usually a very steep fronted wave and as you roll down towards it you find yourself being snapped back the other way. It’s at this point that you can take a wave into the cockpit, which I did several times today. So after a couple of hours of that St Bees Island was reached and we stopped at the entrance to Egremont Passage for a well deserved cup of tea and a bite to eat. By 1130 we were underway again, this time against the tidal flow so our speed dropped by 2 knots until we gained a knot back nearer the mainland. By now the seas had dropped somewhat from this morning but they still had a bite or two with another dump into the cockpit and then I was completely covered by water during the course of taking the Yankee sail down. I was lucky when that happened as since I broke my glasses I have not being wearing them on the foredeck during sail changes etc and if I had been wearing them I would had made another sacrifice to Poseidon and that’s considering the lock I sacrificed this morning!
We arrived at MacKay Marina at 1600 having sailed 29 nautical miles over 6.75 hours. First job was to clean up Seaka and then have a shower and tea. Will now do this blog.
Phillip.
21 06.77’S: 149 13.62’E


Thats all for now shipmates, hope you all enjoyed my little adventures.

Phillip. :D :D :D :D :D :D
Phillip.
SEAKA
A 1969 Mark 1
http://www.sailblogs.com/member/seaka
http://skipr.net

Home port is at Dunbogan on the Camden Haven Inlet, Laurieton NSW
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Phillip
 
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Location: Laurieton, NSW.

Re: Seaka's Voyage to Queensland.

Postby Phillip » Mon Jun 20, 2011 8:01 am

Good News,

The Blog is back up but it will be 24 hours before I can post the photos.

Phillip
MacKay Marina.
Phillip.
SEAKA
A 1969 Mark 1
http://www.sailblogs.com/member/seaka
http://skipr.net

Home port is at Dunbogan on the Camden Haven Inlet, Laurieton NSW
User avatar
Phillip
 
Posts: 1521
Images: 152
Joined: Wed Jan 07, 2009 8:18 pm
Location: Laurieton, NSW.

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