Bow fitting crack

Bow fitting crack

Postby steve » Mon Feb 12, 2018 12:10 pm

If you have a bow fitting of the type shown in the photo below (which I think is standard on Mark 3 and possibly earlier marks), you should consider checking it for cracks.

On mine cracks had developed at both ends of the weld connecting the horizontal plate to the tang which drops down the bow. The cracks had reduced the effective length of the weld to about one third of its original length.

The crack was found by a surveyor (who was doing a survey for insurance purposes) using a magnifying glass but was clearly visible to the eye when closely inspected. The surveyor and I wondered if there was a second weld on the aft side but when I removed the fitting I found that there was no weld on the aft side. Therefore if you find cracking visible on the front side, a repair is required.

Steve
Attachments
rsz_bow_fitting.jpg
rsz_bow_fitting.jpg (267.3 KiB) Viewed 76 times
steve
 
Posts: 42
Images: 13
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2009 8:09 pm

Re: Bow fitting crack

Postby Phillip » Mon Feb 12, 2018 4:25 pm

Thanks Steve,

That's an interesting point and one worth putting on the annual check list.

Remember our Top Hats are now between 30 and 50 years old and things like this will have to be checked on a regular basis into the future.
Phillip.
SEAKA
A 1969 Mark 1
http://www.sailblogs.com/member/seaka
http://skipr.net

Home port is at Dunbogan on the Camden Haven Inlet, Laurieton NSW
User avatar
Phillip
 
Posts: 1536
Images: 152
Joined: Wed Jan 07, 2009 8:18 pm
Location: Laurieton, NSW.

Re: Bow fitting crack

Postby Mike » Mon Feb 12, 2018 5:36 pm

I had the same issue with mine, same fitting, but from a Mk 1. I'd removed it after I noticed the whole fitting swivelling slightly around the through bolt while sailing. Sure enough, no weld on the back, and a crack starting to form on one side.

Furthermore, the piece of wood embedded in the bow tip, which supports the stem piece, had become waterlogged, I assume through water entering from deck where the seal was broken around the through bolt.

To gauge how serious it was I drilled a couple of holes into it, going through from inside the bow. The wood only has a thin layer of glass over it there, and sure enough the drill bit found wet wood.

I decided to chuck be old stem piece, which had done plenty of work, and get a new one built. Instead of relying on the through bolt like the old one, I thought a more modern looking one that encased the outside of the bow tip would work better, particularly as the wood was now structurally compromised. I also thought I'd make it a double roller while I was at it, like the cruisers have. After spending a lot if time thinking about it, I built a model to fit the bow out of cardboard (which I was quite proud of!) and took it to a fabricator. He replicated it in ss. It cost around $500 or so from memory.

To fix the bow itself, I dug all the wet wood out from inside the bow, leaning in from the v berth, and glassed the inside of the bow tip fairly heavily. I can't say that that was a pleasant job!

I reckon the new setup is stronger than the old, more usable with the 2 rollers, and (I think) looks better too.

My cameras on the blink, but I'll post some photos if I can find them.

Good luck,
Michael.
Mike
 
Posts: 23
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2015 2:05 pm

Re: Bow fitting crack

Postby Mike » Mon Feb 12, 2018 5:50 pm

Also, as a side note Steve, your surveyor sounds way better then the one I used when I bought the boat (Rob Sanderson from Hazelwood Marine in NSW). He not only missed my stem piece, but far more obvious things too. He certainly didn't look at anything with a magnifying glass, or even bother bending over!

I'be since learned there are good surveyors, and not so good ones, with mine being in the latter category. I wonder if there is any kind of review site for marine surveyors?

Cheers,
Michael.
Mike
 
Posts: 23
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2015 2:05 pm

Re: Bow fitting crack

Postby steve » Mon Feb 12, 2018 8:32 pm

Hi Mike,

I agree that the surveyor I used (Jeff Casley, Blue Marine) was good. I have used him twice, six years apart. He was recommended to me, and was also the cheapest of those I talked to. He used to build fibreglass racing boats, but I think he no longer does so. He gives sensible, practical, advice.

I read with interest your description of rectifying your wet deck timber. Fortunately my Mark 3 appears to have no timber in the moldings, even though the design drawings show encapsulated plywood. Everywhere I have drilled I have found solid fibreglass, except for something (possibly cement sheet) in the anchor well and timber stiffening encapsulated under the berths. There was definitely no timber near the bow.

Steve
steve
 
Posts: 42
Images: 13
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2009 8:09 pm


Return to Maintenance / Gear

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron

x